An analysis of the story huckleberry finn

huckleberry finn setting

After a great deal of planning, the boys convince the town that a group of thieves is planning to steal Jim.

Humor is used in various ways in the novel, but Huck's deadpan narration and pragmatic personality juxtaposed to events and beliefs that make no logical or practical sense to him provide much of the novel's humor.

Their goal is to reach Cairo, where they can take a steamship up the Ohio River and into the free states. Miss Watson tells Huck he will go to "the bad place" if he does not behave, and Huck thinks that will be okay as long as Miss Watson is not there.

Huckleberry finn characters

A few nights later, a steamboat runs over the raft, and forces Huck and Jim to jump overboard. Upon digging up the grave, the townspeople discover the missing money Huck hid in the coffin. Huck writes a letter to Miss Watson to return Jim, yet he ends up ripping the letter and wishes to free Jim. Instead of going back to the widow's house, he decides to run away. Huck concludes the novel stating he would never have undertaken the task of writing out his story in a book, had he known it would take so long to complete. Amid the chaos, Huck runs back to Jim, and together they start downriver again. That night, they collect Jim and start to run away. The next day, he discovers Miss Watson's slave, Jim, is living on the island. At one point, an entire house floats past them as they stand near the shore. Together, they climb aboard and discover there are three thieves on the wreck, two of whom are debating whether to kill the third.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is autobiographic, ensuring a valuable narrative unity; each scene is delivered as-is rather than being described into fruition.

Huck and Jim climb aboard to see what they can salvage and find a dead man lying in the corner of the house.

the adventures of huckleberry finn summary

He says that, if he had known how much trouble it was to write a book, he would not have tried it. Huck finally gets rid of them, but is left to search for Jim, who gets sold by the King. Upon digging up the grave, the townspeople discover the missing money Huck hid in the coffin.

An analysis of the story huckleberry finn

The shores of the Mississippi River provide the backdrop for the entire book. The Glass Menagerie Commentary Ironically, Huck believes he is committing a sin by going against society and protecting Jim. Pap catches Huck after leaving Judge Thatcher, forces him to hand over the dollar, and threatens to beat Huck if he ever goes to school again. Meanwhile, the humbugs spend their time liquidating the Wilks family property. Continued on next page This first sentence also alludes to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Huck and Tom give Jim forty dollars for being such a good prisoner and letting them free him, while in fact he had been free for quite some time. Huck immediately pretends to be Tom. The next day, he discovers Miss Watson's slave, Jim, is living on the island. The world Huck Finn grew up in is before the abolition of slavery. Huck enjoys his adventures on the raft. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is autobiographic, ensuring a valuable narrative unity; each scene is delivered as-is rather than being described into fruition.
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SparkNotes: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn