Of mice and men literary terms

Resolution—The solution to conflicts presented in a story.

metaphors in of mice and men

Motif—A repeating theme or event. Foreshadowing—When the author provides hints of what may happen later in the story. She felt helpless, alone, and experienced a disturbing sense of floating.

Imagery in of mice and men

This is where the story is born and where the dream farm and Lennie meet their end. General Example: Judy now realizes that false accusations occur, and she decides to forgive the mall police. The bunkhouse represents the spot where conflict is most evident. Even though Lennie and George have their conflicts, they remain the closest of friends. Climax—A turning point in the story. Author: Josh Garten. A comprehensive list can be found here. For example, for magic realism, the students would define the term, and then briefly act out the scenes at the end of the novel involving Lennie and the giant rabbit and Lennie and Aunt Clara.

I remember that now. Personification—Giving human traits qualities, feelings, action, or characteristics to non-living objects things, colors, qualities, or ideas. Curley lashed his body around.

Foreshadowing in of mice and men

This is where the story is born and where the dream farm and Lennie meet their end. Candy must spare his dog from the pain of staying alive. Alliteration—A string of words beginning with the same consonant. They will also be regularly tested on literary terms. Symbolism[ edit ] An interesting example is Candy's dog, suggestive of the senescent American dream that wants rejuvenation symbolized by one of Slim's pups. Around her, everything suddenly became fuzzy and dream-like. Both seem to have a test to spare the one's they love. Motif—A repeating theme or event. Soon, the area seems a more ominous place as George instructs Lennie to hide here if he gets into any trouble. General Example: Judy now realizes that false accusations occur, and she decides to forgive the mall police.

Of Mice and Men Example: George solves his conflict with the ranch boss by explaining falsely that he talks for Lennie, because Lennie was kicked in the head by a horse when he was a kid Author: Josh Garten.

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Of Mice and Men: Literary Terms